All posts by Andrea Strand

Baker Furnace Installs Quench Tank for Supplier in the Heat Treatment Industry

Brea, CA – June 25th, 2019 – Baker Furnace, a division of Thermal Product Solutions, announced the installation of a quench tank for a supplier in the heat treatment industry as part of their aftermarket services. The customer had two quench tanks and three drop bottom furnaces and needed the third quench tank in order to optimize quench loads per day.

The quench tank has three impellers capable of 27,000 GM on a 15,000-gallon tank. This style of agitation allows for thick, large castings to dissipate heat faster. The system runs on VFD’s, which allows for cost savings and the ability to adjust as needed when less agitation is required.

 “The customer had two existing quench tanks: one hot water and one cold water. Having only two tanks hindered quenching on all three drop bottoms, being that it takes 6 hours to heat or cool the tank. Adding the third, dedicated cool water tank, allows the customer to run two more loads per day, which is critical for a commercial heater.” – Sergio Luevano, General Manager

Baker Furnace took on all parts of the project, including the civil engineering, city permitting, and installation. During the installation, three crane rail tracks were extended. To do so, Baker Furnace had to break the concrete, reinforce the concrete to accept the crane rail, and reinstall the crane rail. There was limited space in the facility for the third quench tank; the hoist required a 24’ height and the building was 24’3”. With limited space and a low-profile quench tank design, the system was able to be installed.

Unique features of this hoist tank include:

  • Impellers
  • VFD on each impeller
  • Wireless remote to operate crane and quench tank

Thermal Oxidizers and Ground Flares to Reduce Air Pollution

Air pollution is one of the most serious challenges facing the world today. The mix of particles and gases in air pollution can reach harmful concentrations, both inside and outside. The most well-known negative effects of air pollution are higher disease risks and random temperature fluctuations.

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a variety of chemical gases emitted by certain processes and by some solid objects or liquids. Burning fuels, such as gasoline, wood, coal, and natural gas, produce VOCs.

The American Lung Association reports that some VOCs are dangerous and have cancerous effects. Other VOCs can react with gases to form harmful air pollutants. VOCs can also cause unhealthy smog when they combine with nitrogen oxides, frequently emitted from vehicle exhaust and the burning of coal, diesel fuel, oil, and natural gas.

Destroying VOCs before they reach the air is essential to reducing the compounds’ harmful effects and decreasing air pollution. Thermal oxidizers and ground flares effectively purify dangerous VOCs in emissions before they ever reach the outdoor air.

Thermal Oxidizers

Many companies use thermal oxidizers to destroy VOCs in their industrial air streams. Thermal oxidizers feature a combustion chamber and discharge stack, to expose the untreated air streams to oxygen and high temperatures. Exposure to heat and oxygen for a calculated time (residence time) breaks down the VOCs into carbon dioxide, water vapor, and various other harmless heat-based substances.

After heating the VOC laden air in a combustion chamber, manufacturers can release the gas stream into the atmosphere as a non-volatile substance.

Ground Flares

Refineries and petrochemical facilities rely on ground flares to burn excess hydrocarbon gases that cannot be recovered or recycled. The flare systems burn excess hydrocarbon gases in an environmentally sound manner.

Ground flares can be either enclosed or open. While the structures of enclosed ground flares and open ones are different, the process is essentially the same. Both enclosed and open ground flares remove VOCs effectively, and the processes are less intrusive than the large stacks used by thermal oxidizers.

The ground flare process combines excess gases with steam and/or air, and then burns off the combination to produce water vapor and carbon dioxide. The process is similar to burning liquefied petroleum gases (LPG), frequently used as fuel for home cooking.

Open and closed ground flares

Open ground flares handle large gas flow rates and can burn larger quantities at a time. The units are nearly smokeless and feature a very high gaseous conversion rate. Open ground flares do require large clearances of land to operate, and the units must be kept at a safe distance.

An enclosed ground flare system converts potentially toxic or flammable gases into less harmful vapor without the use of a stack. The units feature vertical combustion chambers that operate by natural air draft. A refractory shell encloses the incineration process to shield radiation, the internal blaze, and noise.

Enclosed ground flares are suitable for managing low and medium gas flow rates. They require less space than open ground flares. These units may be used for gas, liquid, or combined emergency combustion.

Thermal oxidizers and ground flares are clean, efficient processes that effectively remove VOCs from the air. These processes help prevent toxic substances from reaching the air and help reduce the burden of air pollution.

Baker Furnace has been a leading afterburner system and thermal oxidizer manufacturer for more than 25 years. The skilled team at Baker Furnace specializes in custom designing a variety of industrial air pollution abatement systems, including thermal oxidizers and enclosed ground flares.

Connect with us on social media, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, to keep up with our company news and industry updates. Be sure to check back in with our blog every other month to stay up to date with our posts. All of us here at Baker Furnace take great pride in providing equipment that makes the world a cleaner place, and we look forward to continuing this throughout 2019.

Baker Furnace Introduces Augmented Reality Platform for use on Furnace Lines

Baker Furnace, a division of Thermal Product Solutions, is extremely proud to present the Augmented Reality (AR) platform to our furnace lines. Augmented Reality allows operators, maintenance personnel, and engineers to interact with the furnace through a tablet. There are three levels available on the furnaces with a PLC: Augmented Operator, Augmented Maintenance, and Augmented Engineering. 

The AR will have step-by-step procedures, component manuals, mechanical drawings, electrical drawings, and real, live data at the component level. There is no longer a need to open electrical panels and put on ARC flash attire; with the tablet camera, all you have to do is point and click, giving you a view of the inside of the panel with all its components and live data.

 

“We are excited to be able to offer this augmented reality platform and give our customers advanced capabilities in their controls while greatly improving their user experience.” – Sergio Luevano, General Manager

The Augmented Operator level will provide systematic procedures on how to run the furnace. The system logs when the procedure starts and when the procedure ends. This will provide helpful data to your industrial engineers to do a timework study by providing data on typical loads. It will also increase productivity with training new operators and serve as a refresher for standard operating procedures. Operators will have the ability to pull up manuals or send messages to maintenance/engineering with issues or potential issues directly from their tablets.

The Augmented Maintenance level will provide all electrical, mechanical drawings, component manuals, and step-by-step procedures on performing maintenance on critical components. By using the step-by-step procedures, it will provide a log when maintenance was performed and on what item. Maintenance personnel will have the ability to be on the machine and use the tablet to pull up manuals, troubleshooting tips, and have maintenance intervals for each component.

The Augmented Engineering level will provide real, live data of components on the tablet. It is as simple as pointing the tablet camera towards the control panel. Clicking on the image of the panel will allow you to open up the panel on your screen. There is no need to put on ARC flash attire to take readings. Both maintenance and engineering personnel will have the ability to be on the machine and use the tablet to pull up manuals, troubleshooting tips, maintenance intervals and real-time data of components in the cabinet.

What to Expect in 2019 at Baker Furnace

2018 was a strong year for Baker Furnace with equipment shipments around the globe, and we are excited to see what 2019 has in store for us. Baker Furnace shipped a variety of industrial ovens, heat treat furnaces, and pollution control equipment throughout 2018 to industries such as oil and gas, aerospace, and waste management.

Last year, our blog focused on pollution control, specifically air pollution control, liquid waste treatment, and garbage incineration. We also talked about how Baker Furnace pollution control equipment is used for these applications to clean up contaminated air and waste.

This year, our focus will shift towards thermal oxidizers and ground flares. During this blog series, we will do a comparison of thermal oxidizers and ground glares, the situations when they are used, and how they treat polluted air. Connect with us on social media, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, keep up with our company news and industry updates. Be sure to check back in with our blog every other month to stay up to date with our posts. All of us here at Baker Furnace take great pride in providing equipment that makes the world a cleaner place, and we look forward to continuing this in 2019.

Baker Furnace – 2018 Year In Review

Baker Furnace saw another year of growth and success in 2018. Back in 2017, Baker Furnace moved to a larger location in Brea, California, which allowed them to expand their workforce, hiring a variety of positions in skilled trades and engineering. The increase in floorspace and manpower boosted Baker Furnace’s production, resulting in shipments to companies in the oil and gas, aerospace, pollution control, and waste management industries. This equipment was used for applications such as solution heat treating, waste incineration, fume incineration, and aluminum aging.

Entering the international market was another huge contributor to this success that Baker Furnace experienced. Baker Furnace sent pieces of equipment to six different international countries. Among the equipment sent overseas was a custom waste incineration system to a pollution control company in the Republic of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean.

“For Baker Furnace, 2018 experienced a huge step into the international market. Equipment shipped to Mexico, Canada, Chile, Columbia, Argentina, and the Marshall Islands. The highlight of the year was shipping a waste incineration unit requiring four high volume shipping containers and three special containers that weighed over 55,000 pounds and required special packaging to survive its 12-week journey at sea.” – Dave Strand, President & CEO, TPS

Baker Furnace Ships Custom Waste Incineration System to Pollution Control Company

Baker Furnace announced the shipment of a custom waste incineration system to a pollution control company. These incinerators will be used to burn off waste after a 12-hour process. The system is designed with three gasification chambers that can burn 10 tons of waste a day per chamber. The waste incinerator is being installed in the Republic of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean.

The maximum temperature rating of the waste incineration system is 1900°F. The proximity to the ocean causes an issue to salt contamination. The system is designed to withstand the harsh salt environment by using a special epoxy paint on the exterior. The harsh environment had to be considered on the selection on all components including but not limited to, diesel firing burners, hydraulics, and conduit runs.

Pollution control equipment has become very popular in recent years. The islands of the Pacific have limited space to store waste and must find ways to dispose of it in a way that are safe for the environment.” – Sergio Luevano, General Manager.

Unique features of this waste incineration system include:

  • Diesel fired burners
  • Two-layer castable
  • High-temperature blast gate
  • Max temperature 1900°F, Normal operating 1800°F

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Recap of 2018’s Success

Baker Furnace has been designing and manufacturing industrial ovens, heat treat furnaces, and pollution control equipment since 1980, and 2018 was another terrific year of growth for us. After moving to a new, larger location in Brea, California in 2017, we’ve been able to expand our workforce by hiring a variety of positions in skilled trades and engineering. The additional facility space and manpower helped us to boost our production, which resulted in shipments to companies in the oil and gas, aerospace, pollution control, and waste management industries. This equipment was used for applications such as solution heat treating, waste incineration, fume incineration, and aluminum aging.

Throughout the year our blog series focused on pollution control including air pollution control, liquid waste treatment, and garbage incineration. In the blogs, we reviewed the causes of various pollution and how a variety of pollution control equipment is used to clean up contaminated air and waste. Read below for a brief overview of our topics.

Air Pollution Abatement

Take a deep breath. If you filled your lungs with clean, fresh air, you may have thermal oxidizers to thank. Thermal oxidizers help you breathe easier, reduce disease, and even live longer by cleaning pollutants from the air. A thermal oxidizer breaks down pollutants by exposing hazardous gases to high temperatures and then releases the treated gases into the air.

Baker Furnace has been an industry leader in custom industrial pollution control system engineering and manufacturing for more than 25 years. Our skilled team specializes in a variety of pollution abatement systems, including thermal oxidizers, for industrial air pollution control.

Treating Liquid Waste

Nearly every industry relies on water to manufacture, process, wash, dilute, cool, and transport their products. Many of these processes make water unfit for use and, unfortunately, there is a finite amount of clean water on earth. Without proper treatment, the inhabitants of the world would quickly run out of the water they need to survive. Liquid waste treatment helps reclaim some of this “used” water.

Baker Furnace offers state-of-the-art industrial liquid waste incinerators for liquid waste treatment and liquid waste management. Industry professionals rely on Baker Furnace’s liquid waste incinerators to handle nearly any type of liquid, including petrochemical waste, oil refinery waste, low CV (Calorific Value), high COD (chemical oxygen demand), liquid chemical waste, liquid ink waste, dyes waste, and many more.

Addressing the Garbage Epidemic

The environmental implications of today’s growing landfills cannot be ignored. The population across the globe quadrupled in the 20th century. On average, Americans produce 4.4 pounds of garbage every day; the nation produces 254 million tons a year. Because of the increasing amount of garbage produced each year, and the slow rate at which the garbage decomposes, landfills will continue to grow in number and size.

Incinerating garbage is an effective solution to reduce the amount of waste buried in landfills. In the past, municipalities were reluctant to incinerate waste because traditional methods produced toxic gases. Luckily today incinerator technology has advanced to include filters and systems that process these gases to remove all toxins prior to emitting the cleaned air into the environment. Baker Furnace’s waste incinerators are used to reduce garbage in settings with limited space for disposal.

Our team here at Baker Furnace takes great pride in providing equipment that makes the world a cleaner place, and we look forward to continuing this in 2019.

Waste Incineration: Addressing the Rising Concern of Overflowing Landfills

With the growing size of today’s landfills, the environmental implications cannot be ignored. From atmospheric effects, to compromised water supplies, society needs to take a proactive approach in dealing with the concern’s landfills pose.

The use of recycled materials has contributed to an efficient solution, as shown with statistics from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2014. The study showed the situation improving and waste production being limited from 89 percent in the 1980s down to 53 percent as of 2014.

Another method of dealing with the overflow of trash in these landfills is through waste incineration. Many facilities incorporate a mix of recycling and incineration to reduce the amount of waste.

Landfills – A Growing Problem

World population quadrupled throughout the 20th century. Throughout that time, our growing population became a society of consumers who prize the convenience of disposable goods. Our exploding population combined with increased consumption of disposable goods creates one significant problem: garbage.

Humans produce garbage at a phenomenal rate. The average American creates 4.4 pounds of garbage every day; the nation produces 254 million tons of the stuff every year. Garbage poses special problems to communities and the environment. Most of the garbage is stored in landfills, where the waste decomposes at a snail’s pace. Landfills are increasingly common and getting larger all the time, which is challenging to island communities and other areas with limited space.

There are more than 2,000 active municipal solid waste landfills in the United States, according to the EPA. There are thousands more inactive landfills sprawled across the nation. These landfills are a significant source of pollution. Biodegradable organic matter in landfills breaks down to produce methane, which traps heat in the atmosphere to produce air pollution. Rain can release highly toxic chemicals from the landfill to cause groundwater pollution.

The rate at which we produce waste vastly outpaces the rate at which this waste decomposes in landfills. Plastic waste can take up to 1,000 years to decompose. Food waste, which is the largest waste in American landfills, can take months to break down. An orange peel can take up to six months to break down in a landfill, for example. While this does not seem like a lot at first glance, the average American eats about 9 pounds of fresh oranges each year and consumes about four times as much in orange juice, and all those peels take a long time to decompose.

Because of the increasing amount of garbage produced, and the slow rate at which the mountains of garbage shrink due to decomposition, landfills will continue to grow in number and size.

Humans will generate twice as much solid waste by the year 2025, according to some estimates, skyrocketing from 3.5 million tons each day to about 6 million tons daily. Worse still, the amount of solid waste will only keep growing. Global trash production will likely hit its highest rate sometime after 2100, when humans will produce approximately 11 million tons of trash every day. At this rate, our world will eventually run out of places to dispose of the solid waste that fills our garbage cans.

Clearly, we need a better approach to garbage.

Waste Incineration – An Effective Solution to the Garbage Epidemic

Incineration is a viable solution to the globe’s mounting garbage problem, as incinerating garbage effectively reduces the amount of waste buried in landfills. In the past, municipalities were reluctant to incinerate waste because traditional methods of burning garbage produced toxic gases. Fortunately, advancements in incinerator technology now include filters and systems that process the gases to remove all toxins prior to emitting the cleaned air into the environment.

There are several advantages of waste incineration. Garbage incineration is beneficial for nearly every municipality, but it is increasingly essential for island communities and other areas with limited space for landfills. Incineration reduces the volume of waste by about 95 percent, depending on the specific materials included in that waste, and decreases the solid mass of the original waste by 85 percent. This means incineration reduces the amount of material that ends up in the landfill, an essential benefit for countries and islands that have very little land available for waste disposal. Waste incineration is also beneficial in the management of medical waste and certain types of hazardous waste, as a waste incinerator can bring up temperatures high enough to destroy harmful pathogens and toxins.

Baker Furnace manufactures waste incinerators that are used to reduce the amount of garbage in settings with limited space for disposal. Baker Furnace also supplies thermal oxidizers and afterburners to remove toxins from the emissions created during the incineration process. For more information about pollution control equipment contact Baker Furnace today.

Controlling Pollution with Liquid Waste Treatment: Part 2

In part-1 of this blog series, we went over the primary types of wastewater, domestic and industrial. In part-2, we will be going over the various treatment methods for liquid waste. There are two main types of liquid waste treatment: primary and secondary.

Primary liquid waste treatment focuses on reducing solids and organic material to limit pollution. Once treated, the purified water is discharged to surface water or groundwater reserves.

Secondary wastewater treatment methods remove toxic substances and dissolved matter from liquids. This more advanced approach to liquid waste treatment involves the use of physical, biological, and chemical methods to remove toxins and harmful substances from wastewater. While the treated water may be clean, the substances removed from the water or created by the water treatment process still need management. Some residual substances, known as sludges or biosolids, may be safe enough to dispose of in a landfill or used as fertilizer. Other residuals are more harmful – the only way to deal with these pollutants is to incinerate them.

A liquid waste incinerator at a regulated medical waste treatment facility renders infectious waste harmless. Hazardous chemical waste, as defined by the EPA, requires proper storage, transportation, and incineration by federally permitted storage, transportation, and incineration facilities.

Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDFs) use special incinerators to burn chemicals at high enough temperatures to break the chemicals into their individual components, such as water and carbon dioxide. Harmless water vapor is released into the environment. Carbon dioxide, heavy metals, and other potentially harmful are removed for further processing. The incinerators TSDFs use can be expansive and take up quite a bit of real estate.

Manufacturers, hospitals, and other industries also use liquid waste incinerators, but these furnaces must meet tighter specifications. These liquid waste disposal systems must be able to treat various volumes of wastewater, depending on the quantity and makeup of the water, and do so in a limited amount of space.

Baker Furnace offers state-of-the-art industrial liquid waste incinerators for liquid waste treatment and liquid waste management. Industry professionals rely on Baker Furnace’s liquid waste incinerators to handle nearly any type of liquid, including petrochemical waste, oil refinery waste, low CV (Calorific Value), high COD (chemical oxygen demand), liquid chemical waste, liquid ink waste, dyes waste and many more. Designed to suit various volumes of industrial waste, Baker Furnace’s liquid waste disposal systems have process flow rates of up to 400 gallons per hour and can meet the most stringent application and installation space requirements for nearly every industry that uses water.

Visit the Baker Furnace website to learn more about the types of liquid waste incinerators available. Be sure to check back next month for our next blog post. Follow Baker Furnace on social media to stay up to date with company and industry news (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn).

Controlling Pollution with Liquid Waste Treatment: Part 1

Water is essential to life. Humans depend on clean, safe water for drinking, bathing, laundry and more. Nearly every industry relies on water to manufacture, process, wash, dilute, cool and transport their products. Many of these processes make water unfit for use and, unfortunately, there is a finite amount of clean water on earth. Without proper treatment, the inhabitants of the world would quickly run out of the water they need to survive. 

Liquid waste treatment helps reclaim some of this “used” water. In fact, about a billion gallons of treated wastewater is reclaimed for non-potable use every day, according to the trade magazine for public works officials, Public Works. While the nearly 22,000 publicly-owned treatment works are responsible for pollution control with liquid waste treatment, manufacturers must also do their part. 

Wastewater is simply water that a person or industry has used. There are two main types of wastewater: domestic and industrial. Depending on its use, wastewater usually contains some type of contaminant. 

Domestic wastewater, also known as sanitary wastewater, comes from toilets, sinks, baths/showers, and laundry. This type of wastewater may contain intestinal disease-causing organisms from body wastes. 

Industrial wastewater discharged during manufacturing and other commercial processes may contain residual acids, oils, dissolved metals, and toxic chemicals. Many industries produce liquid waste, including hospitals, pharmaceutical, laboratories, automobile, petro chemicals, oil and natural gas drilling, and textiles. There are several types of liquid waste produced by these industries, including oil refinery waste, petrochemical waste, liquid chemical waste, dyes waste and liquid ink waste. Industrial liquid waste may be high COD (chemical oxygen demand) that contains a large amount of organic matter or have low calorific value (CV), which makes this liquid difficult to treat. 

Both domestic and industrial wastewater creates water pollution. Liquid waste treatment involves chemical and physical processes to remove some or all contaminants to make it fit for reuse or release into the environment. 

Baker Furnace offers state-of-the-art industrial liquid waste incinerators for liquid waste treatment and liquid waste management. Visit the Baker Furnace website to learn more about the types of liquid waste incinerators available. Be sure to check back next month for part-2 of this blog series, where the focus will be on the various treatment methods used to remove toxic substances and dissolved matter from liquids. Follow Baker Furnace on social media to stay up to date with company and industry news (FacebookTwitterLinkedIn).